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Useful Links

There are now so many websites and publications dealing with Autism Spectrum Disorders, it can be easy to be overwhelmed and confused about which are reputable and worthwhile.

The following books and websites are a good place to start.

Books

The list of books and publications dealing with Autism Spectrum Disorders is too exhaustive to reproduce here, but the following publishers have many good titles.

Jessica Kingsley Publishers (http://www.jkp.com)

An independent publisher of accessible professional and academic books in the social and behavioural sciences.

Brookes Publishing (http://www.brookespublishing.com)

Brookes Publishing has books and other resources for professionals and carers who work with children with developmental disabilities and their families.

Book In Hand (http://www.bookinhand.com.au)

Book In Hand is an Australian book supplier run by people who have family and friends with ASDs. It has a wide collection of material in this field and related topics.

Websites
National Autism Society UK (www.nas.org.uk)

Britain’s leading autism charity group. A good source of developments in approaches to autism.

ASPECT (www.aspect.org.au)

Aspect is one of the leading providers of autism-specific services in Australia.

Australian Advisory Board on Autism Spectrum Disorders (formerly known as the Autism Council of Australia) (http://www.autismadvisoryboard.org.au)

The Australian Advisory Board on Autism Spectrum Disorders is the national peak body representing people who have an autism spectrum disorder, their families, carers and helpers. Through its members, the Advisory Board represents over 12,000 people who live with an autism spectrum disorder and who are members of, or who obtain services from, the Advisory Board’s member organisations. There are many more people who have an autism spectrum disorder (often accompanying other conditions) but whose needs are met either privately or through other disability programs. The focus of the Advisory Board is working with governments to develop appropriate policies for people who have an autism spectrum condition, their families and carers, disseminating information about ASDs and working with the Australian ASD community to build skills.

A4 – Autism & Aspergers Advocacy Australia (http://www.a4.org.au)

Autism & Aspergers Advocacy Australia was formed in response to the growing demand from people with autism spectrum condition and their families who wish to have a more direct involvement in raising the profile of autism-related issues with the decision-makers, to government and the media. The aim of the advocacy organisation is to provide a voice on a national and a state and territory level for individuals and groups across Australia.

NSW Department of Ageing, Disability and Home Care (http://www.dadhc.nsw.gov.au)

The State Government’s site contains a number of useful links on autism research, funding and service providers.  Just enter the word autism in the search engine. Of particular interest is Jacqueline Roberts’ paper Definition of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Parents Council of NSW (http://www.parentscouncil.nsw.edu.au)

The Parents Council has been representing parents of children at non-government schools since 1962 and has been constantly evolving. It has progressed from its small beginnings in Goulburn into one that effectively advocates the needs of parents of non-government school children in the State and Federal arenas.

Raising Children Network - Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (http://raisingchildren.net.au)

The website provides information, online resources and interactive functions to support parents, carers and professionals.  This includes impartial, evidence-based information about Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) and early intervention treatments available to children with ASDs.